Author: Chris Jabas

See the "About Me" on this website.

Huevember – Day 16

Ready to sail, captain.

With how little time I’m still having to complete these drawings, I’m now filing them under speed paintings as well. I tried a technique I saw from a few different artist forums for brainstorming: make a couple of very simple shapes with a large brush as a kind of silhouette of what you want to sketch, then pick one and start filling in details.

Huevember – Day 5

Orange alert! I grew up in the 80’s, the era of Aliens, Predator, 2001 and other movies where there was an element of horror being introduced to the idealistic visions of the future. Nothing quite struck a chord in me as the heroine in distress trying to avoid a nasty fate, with danger lurking around the corner she wasn’t watching.

I’m not having as much time to work on these pieces as I’d like, and am having to post them out of order. This is a messy thing to try to do on a daily basis, hence the challenge. I’ve set up a page where they’ll be posted in order that you can find at this link: Huevember Challenge 2017.

Being Overshadowed By A Cloud

My wife and I had the chance to be in Nashville for the solar eclipse to witness the totality, something I’ve never experienced before. Though a cloud obscured the sky above downtown during the totality, I still stood in wonder as the sky darkened to twilight, then dusk in the matter of seconds. The streetlights blinked on and birds began flying erratically in the air. The world seemed to quiet as the city held its breath, trying to capture the magic of the moment.

The last time I witnessed an eclipse was in second grade, and I had to work for it. With the eclipse coming, my teacher Mrs. Wallace made us all craft pinhole viewers out of shoeboxes. Each took their shoebox and angled it so the the light of the sun shone onto the back of the closed box, allowing us to safely view the “picture” it made from one side. It was explained that while it wasn’t safe to stare directly at the sun (you’ll go blind, kids!), you could safely look at its image the little pinhole created.

That lesson always stuck with me. When something big happens, I tend to look around to see what effect the event is having on the environment and the people around me. That’s why I don’t think I was cheated by having a cloud in the way during the totality. I still got to see how it affected the people and things around me.

Imagine the eclipse from the perspective of the moon. Many things had to go right for it to fully eclipse the sun to the Earth, and there were years of preparations for conditions to be just right for the perfect performance.

And then a cloud got in the way for the people in Nashville.

When you prepare and plan for an event and try to control everything so that people can see your brilliance, all too often something that cannot be controlled will “ruin” your moment or steal your thunder. Do not be discouraged and take the disruption in stride. You cannot see the full extent of your influence and do not get to see all the fruits of your labors immediately. When starting a new marketing campaign, it can take months or even years to see the full effect of the new advertisements. But you will see them. The audience may not laugh at the right time, or they may not have an earth shattering revelation that transforms their lives in a flash of glorious light radiating from their face. But they will still have listened. Your art or craft may never be more than a hobby to express yourself. But you’re still better for having shared it with existence.

Do not let the uncontrollable stop you, or even slow you down.

Even the shadow will be an experience to behold.